Through well as a story that relates to

            Through
explicit details, Firoozeh Dumas’s “The “F Word”” explains the realities of  

living in America with a non-American name. Her
metaphors, sentence structure, and

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organization create a well written insider to
struggles immigrants face. The story of

Firoozeh’s name gives an insight of what she went
through growing up. As well as a story that

relates to the lives of people who had struggles with
their names.

            Dumas’s
metaphors give a deeper understanding of the name calling a majority of

immigrants go through. Dumas writes metaphors that are
influenced by her culture and represent

her as well as other immigrants. One metaphor Dumas
wrote was, “my name drew people like

flies to baklava.” This is a great metaphor that explains
the way her name draws unnecessary

attention to herself. She has no accent so it confuses
Americans how she can speak English so

well but not be American. Another metaphor of hers
involved spices, she wrote how Americans

should make space in their spice cabinets for new
spices, so they can learn new things.

            Along
with her metaphors, Dumas has a sentence structure that is thought out
carefully to

make reading her memoir feel as if you are listening
to her speak. There are no facts, it is just the

story of her name. She uses a sarcastic tone but
speaks of a serious matter in which Americans

tend to be disrespectful when they meet someone who is
different from them. There is a

continuous flow that does not get stuck. She writes
her sentences with words that add to her

analogies and the way she feels about this name
situation immigrants face in America.

            Dumas’s
organization of her story is outlined to detail but not so much that the memoir

feels slopped together. Her title choice, the “F Word”,
is intriguing and misleading However, it

adds to her sarcastic tone throughout the memoir. She
begins her story by explaining the

meanings of the names of people she knows. The names
are different from Americans and seem

difficult but actually have beautiful meanings. Then
she explains how she felt terrible growing

up because no one cared to know her once they heard
her Iranian name. She then told the story of

how she chose to change her name so her life would be
easier, and it was but then she felt like a

fake so she went back to her old name. Dumas’s
organization of her writing is effective because

it does not jump from one point to another. Instead it
is written to be read as a timeline that

portrays the realities of growing up as an immigrant
with a “difficult” name.

            Firoozeh
Dumas gave a true insight on the lives of many immigrants and one of the

toughest struggles they face. When someone learns your
name that is how they see you and how

you are known. If people think your name is
challenging they might think the same of you, they

might not care to know you.