The living off the avails of prostitution, and

The case of Bedford v. Canada challenged sections of the
Criminal Code connected to prostitution. Everyone has rights, against disproportionate
government undertaking, under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom. The
government has a duty to guarantee laws do not violate rights under the
Charter. If a law violates a right guaranteed in the charter, the courts can
find it unconstitutional, and be modified. Charter rights are not unrestricted
as the government can infringe rights, if the limit is reasonably substantiated.

The court dismissed, s.210 operating a common bawdy house, s. 212 living off
the avails of prostitution, and s.213 no communication between prostitute and
client in public. This act ensued in a breach of their rights under S.7 of the
Canadian charter to freedom of expression and security of the person.

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     The
case asserted that the laws permit sex workers to make their work safe. The law
obstructed this, and promoted to the harm prostitutes encounter. The consequence
of the laws, signified though prostitution was legal, they could not work safely
indoors driving them to the streets, unable to hire security, and renounced
them communication that permitted to weight clients.

      A characteristic
of S.7 examination, is the premises regarding legislative aim. In the
prostitution reference, Dickson dismissed the insinuation that the term desired
to tackle exploitation and subordination of women, that are the actuality in
sex work. In comparison, a criminal interdiction on prostitution could be extreme,
creating black markets and escalating the impact that S.210, 212, and 213 were conceived
to reproduce.

       It is not regarding the
legality of prostitution, but if the laws Parliament has ruled is
constitutional. The Criminal code occasionally can violate rights, and crucial to
understand if the violation is reasonable to restrict freedom and rights under
the charter. The case identifies the severity of prostitution laws on those it
is meant to be protecting, recognizes the broadness of principles of
fundamental justice and the fluidity of case patterns